Cannabis Day 2018: Canada to Legalize Cannabis by Canada Day, July 1, 2018

According to a report from the CBC, the Liberal government will table legislation on April 10, 2017, and are expected to legalize cannabis by Canada Day 2018. Bill Blair, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice heading the federal cannabis file, briefed the liberal caucus this...

According to a report from the CBC, the Liberal government will table legislation on April 10, 2017, and are expected to legalize cannabis by Canada Day 2018.

Bill Blair, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice heading the federal cannabis file, briefed the liberal caucus this weekend in Ottawa on cannabis legislation and roll-out plan.

According to CBC, legislation will broadly follow the recommendations set out in the final report by the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation.

Provincial governments expected to decide how cannabis will be distributed and sold,  and to set prices and minimum age.

Under the legislation, says the CBC, the federal government will be responsible for the quality and safety of Canada’s cannabis supply and will continue to license and regulate Licensed Producers (LPs). Provincial governments will have the right to decide how cannabis will be distributed and sold, and to set prices and minimum age. The federal government will set the minimum age for legal purchase at 18, while the provincial governments may set a higher age limit.

Trudeau to make good on cannabis legalization election promise.

Justin Trudeau's 2015 campaign promise to legalize cannabis by April 2017 is viewed as a major reason for the prime minister's youth support. The forthcoming announcement will allow the Liberal government to keep this campaign promise.

Four Cannabis plants per household.

The Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) came about after the federal court case Allard v. Canada. This case found that the former Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR), which required individuals to purchase cannabis only from licensed producers, violated liberty and security rights protected by section seven of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and that individuals who require cannabis for medical purposes did not have "reasonable access". The new ACMPR allows patients to grow cannabis for medical use. According to the CBC report, Canadians who want to grow cannabis for personal recreational use will be able to do so, and will be limited to four plants per household.

In this article

Join the Conversation